2010 ACBL NABC Orlando: Senior Knockout, R16, 4 of 4, Board 55 Hamman and Zia

2010 Senior KO R16 Segment 4 of 4

Board 55 in the final session was a big swing board for Bob Hamman and Zia, playing on the Meltzer Senior Knockout Team.  First, here’s the hands, bidding, later a review of the disasterous play.  Please click on the topic title “2010 ACBL…” to view our comments.

Board 55
South Deals
Both Vul

♠ 3
K Q 9 5 4
6 5 2
♣ K Q 9 2

♠ 2
J 6 3 2
K J 10 7 3
♣ A 8 5

N

W

E

S

♠ A Q 10 9 8 7 6 5
10 8
9 4
♣ 6

♠ K J 4
A 7
A Q 8
♣ J 10 7 4 3

West

North

East

South

Zia

Hanna

Hamman

Lebi

1 ♣

1

2

4 ♠

Dbl

Pass

Pass

Pass

4 ♠ x by East

Trick

Lead

2nd

3rd

4th

1. S

A

2

5

8

2. S

A

3

6

4

3. S

8

K

2

9

4. W

J

5

♠ 10

Q

5. E

♠ 5

4

2

3

6. E

♠ A

J

3

♣ 2

7. E

♣ 6

3

A

9

8. W

7

4

10

♠ K

Made 4 — +790

At the Bridge Table – True Confessions

The Beat: American Contract Bridge League Sectional Tournament, Saturday, California Bay Area

The Game: Its the start of the second session playing “A level” competitors

The Board: We’re on the second hand of the first round

The Bidding: With favorable vulnerability partner passes and RHO opens 1 Spade

 

P – (1S) – ?

Dealer: North
Vul: East/West

Pass

 

1 Spade

 

9 6

K J 10 9 7 6 3 2

9 3

2

Partner prefers day games and after breaking several hours between sessions, we’re hopeful the evening game won’t drag on with slow play.  Our opponents are pleasant Scandinavian chaps.  You know the variety – very friendly, yet after the hand is over you are left scratching your head wondering how you ended up with a bottom board.  Never underestimate any Bridge player who comes from a climate with cold weather; they have way too much time on their hands and they all play like foxes.

Holding South’s hand, it looks as though the opponents have an easy vulnerable game, perhaps a run for a small slam. Bidding some number of Hearts will likely stoke the fire for the opponents.   Probably the rest of the field will overcall 4 Hearts, with the opponents winding up in either a black suit game, slam, or perhaps a high-level Notrump contract.

My partner and I tend to “hit the ball down the center of the fairway” avoiding mastermind bids.  But for some reason on this hand, I just couldn’t resist throwing in a dreaded psych bid.  And so I plunged into the deep dark, dreaded underworld bidding 1 Notrump – in tempo, of course.

Needless to say, my LHO was perplexed to say the least.  After about 15 seconds, my partner was kindly asked our Notrump overcall range: “Yes, we play a standard 15-17 HCP range”  was the response. After pondering some more, LHO delivers the expected “balance of power” double for penalty.

At this point, the plot thickens.  My partner has several thousand masterpoints and always bids in tempo, avoid hesitations, and never inadvertently provides me unauthorized information – at least not until this hand.  You see, when you never make a psychic bid partner most likely thinks its the OPPONENT who has made a psyche or bizarre call.

And so the torture begins, partner begins to grab a pass card, then seems to be looking for the redouble card, then her hand pulls away from the bidding box – oh oh, this auction is not going to be pretty.  After some time, partner again heads for the front of the bidding box, fumbles a bit, again withdrawing and pulls… THREE NOTRUMP!

Within a few seconds my RHO who opened 1 Spade soundly pulls his double bid from the bidding box, softly placing it on the table.  The opponents are truly too kind, not calling for the director after my partner’s tortured bid (all my fault, I might add).

And so as they say, “the chickens have come home to roost” and I’m back in the hot seat.   Well, playing an occasional online Goulash Bridge game where every hand has wild distribution (only surpassed by wild players on EVERY hand in every game), I felt well prepared to recover from my dirty bid.   And so after evaluating my hand about 5-7 seconds, I placed my 4 Heart bid on the table.   As an aside, good players at this level seldom miss observing any kind of “tell” by an opponent as so I’m using my best theatrical performance to act like an android as I withdraw 4 Hearts from the bidding box in normal tempo, placing it on the table in a movement that’s not too smooth, not exhibiting an obvious “hitch” and not letting my eyes waiver from normal behavior.  So how did I do?

In similar even cadence to my RHO (East) double of partner’s 3 Notrump call, now my LHO places his red “x” double smoothly on the table.  He’s got us on the run, or so he thinks.  But wait, there’s more!  Partner tanks holding the following:


 

P – (1S) – 1N! – (X);
3N – (X) – 4H! – (X);
?

Dealer: North
Vul: East/West

A 10

4

7 5 3

A Q 9 7 6 5 3

 


 

9 6

K J 10 9 7 6 3 2

9 3

2

Yup, you guessed it – partner still believes my initial 1 Notrump call and in an attempt to save the auction bids… 5 Clubs!  Well, needless to say East no longer wastes any time doubling that contract.  Ditto here – there’s not much sense for any feeble attempts to pull off  ”Oscar award-winning” theatrics and so my 5 Heart bid hits the table in the same cadence and enthusiasm as RHOs double.   LHO doubles and by this time partner has worked out my sorted psych, passing out the auction.

After the dust settled, we’re down a few tricks but with favorable vulnerability and opponents missing a Spade, Notrump or Diamond suit game we score very good results (not that our performance deserved it).   By the way, I agree with my partner’s disciplined pass as opposed to opening 3 Clubs in first seat with an outside suit Ace.  Outside Aces at the 2 level are fine but at the 3 level don’t seem to make sense.  If a player has an Ace and the requisite “two of top three” honors in the preempt suit, than either open at the 1 level or pass; with any kind of fit, the hand rates as a 6 or 7 Losing Trick Count holding.  In the postmortem, partner and I have had several discussions about psychic bids and when I “might” use a rapier psych bid in the future (see http://www.bridgehands.com/P/psychic_bid.htm).   In retrospect, we both agreed the errant bid did indeed have one positive attribute – after my wayward bid neither of us were a bit sleepy the rest of the evening session and we ended up just a nose out of first place in our direction.   Still, psychic bid are probably best served (or instigated) at the end of a session… if at all.

2010 World Bridge Series Championship Finals – Open Pairs

Here’s another interesting hand, fresh from the pros at the World Bridge Series open pairs event.  Our defending champions, Fu Zhong and Jack Jie Zhao, demonstrated that China has skills far beyond their manufacturing skills.  In pairs games, every extra trick can make a huge difference in the scoring.  So when partnership’s do not have an 8 card major fit, pairs regularly stretch to enjoy the trick score benefits of playing in a notrump contract.   Accordingly, on this hand Jack, playing North’s hand, thoughtfully rebid 1 Notrump rather than 2 Hearts with his 5=4=2=2 shape.  Do you see why he chose this approach?

Dealer : South
1D – 1S;
1N – All pass

_A 9 6 3 2
_10 7 5 3
_Q 2
_K 2

_Q 5 4
_Q J 8
_A 9
_Q 10 8 7 3


_Lead: C7

_K 10 7
_K 9 6 2
_8 6 4 3
_6 4

_J 8
_A 4
_K J 10 7 5
_A J 9 5

Take a second look at North’s honors – with non-working honors that are spread in every suit, rebidding 1 Notrump seems reasonable (although on the downside the partnership might miss a 5-3 Spade fit).  At this point it’s easy sailing for Fu, ultimately winning 3 Clubs, 4 Diamonds 1 Spade and 1 Heart for 150 points.  So while many other players holding the pair’s 5=4=2=2 and 2=2=5=4 shape tended to rebid their shape, Fu and Jack scored high marks for analyzing their spread honors.

You can see this and another of their interesting hands here as well as a link to the bulletins of the entire 16 day session here.

Intermediate & Advanced #12: Cover Cards, Losing Trick Count – Part II

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In issue #12 of our Intermediate-Advanced newsletter, we continue our exploration of advanced hand evaluation using Losing Trick Count (LTC).  Having looked at opener’s LTC methods, we will turn our attention to responder’s hand evaluation methodology and opener’s follow-up bidding.  Recall that making suit contracts is all about suit length and quick tricks with primary controls (Aces and Kings).  While LTC calculations still works for responder, we will learn using “Cover Cards” is a far quicker method to effectively evaluate bids. And Cover Card hand evaluation is particularly effective when considering game and slam bids.

Quiz yourself here on Cover Cards. (a 4MB music audio is attached – please allow time to load)

Also in this newsletter, we will check out an Appeal at the Washington DC NABC.  And like our last newsletter, again we will focus on what can go wrong when declarer makes a generalized claim without stating a specific line of play.

Note: Viewing the hands below requires your EMAIL reader to use “fixed fonts” (not proportional). If you have problems reading this document, please view our online web-based copy or Adobe Acrobat PDF file suitable for printing.

2010 World Bridge Series Championship Finals – Rosenblum Cup

So after two weeks of grueling Bridge play, the 2010 World Bridge Series Championship Finals are in with Bobby Levin and Steve Weinstein taking home the gold.  And while Zia Mahmoon and Eric Rodwell didn’t fare quite so well, leave it to Zia keep Bridge as exciting as ever.

 Board 8
Dealer: West
VUL:  None

 J 8 2
Q 10 8 4 3 2
9
Q 7 6

 –
6
A K Q J 8 4 3 2
A K J 5

 10 9 7 6 5 3
9 5
10 7 5
10 4

 A K Q 4
A K J 7
6
9 8 3 2

At first it looked like Zia would bid like a mortal, opening 1 Diamond and actually passing South’s double in passout seat.  But after North responded 1 Heart and partner Eric bid 1 Spade with East’s cards, things started getting interesting.  South responded 3 Hearts and in Zia’s true form he actually bid 4 Spades!  No, that’s not a misprint. Yes, we know, we know, Zia has a Spade void – but you forget, this *IS* Zia after all.  Next went 5 Hearts by North so what do you think Zia bid next?  Would you believe 5 Spades?  Well, we didn’t think so either but that’s what the recorder shows.  So now we’re in utter disbelief, too!  Of course, South just couldn’t resist the urge to double 5 Spades – could you?   Well after South’s (Louk Verhees) double, Zia was able to complete his “rapier psyche” (thrust and retreat), rebidding 6 Diamonds – promptly doubled by South.   And the lead was… drum roll please… the lead is the… low Club 6.  Zia inserted the winning 10 from the dummy, pulled trump, playing three more rounds of Clubs and pitching Hearts in dummy to make 13 tricks for 1190 points (69 of 70 matchpoints).  Who said Bridge is a boring game.  And our sympathies to Ricco van Prooijen sitting North.  Leading a Heart will keep the declarer from making an undeserved overtrick, ensuring a much sounder sleep.  Just ask us – been there, own that tee shirt.
http://www.bridgehands.com/Tournaments/WBF/2010_World_Bridge_Championship/Bul_15.pdf

In addition to the prestigious Rosenblum Cup Knockouts, competion included: World Mixed Pairs, World Women Knockout Teams (for the McConnell Cup), World Senior Knockout Teams (for the Rand Cup), GENERALI World Open Pairs, GENERALI World Women Pairs, World Senior Pairs (for the Hiron Trophy), World Mixed Swiss Teams, and World Junior Championship.  To see the daily bulletins, see:

http://www.bridgehands.com/Tournaments/WBF/2010_World_Bridge_Championship/index.htm

Saturday, October  2, 2010       Sunday, October 3, 2010          Monday, October 4, 2010
Tuesday, October 5, 2010         Wednesday, October 6, 2010   Thursday, October 7, 2010
Friday, October 8, 2010             Saturday, October 9, 2010       Sunday, October 10, 2010
Monday, October 11, 2010     Tuesday, October 12, 2010      Wednesday, October 13, 2010
Thursday, October 14, 2010     Friday, October 15, 2010        Saturday, October 16, 2010
Saturday Evening, October 17, 2010

Many thanks to the WBF for running a great tournament and sharing their exciting bulletins.   For more details, please see the WorldBridge website

 Board 8
Dealer: West
VUL:  None

 J 8 2
Q 10 8 4 3 2
9
Q 7 6

 –
6
A K Q J 8 4 3 2
A K J 5

 10 9 7 6 5 3
9 5
10 7 5
10 4

 A K Q 4
A K J 7
6
9 8 3 2

Compare your Bridge bidding with pros in World Bridge Series – Rosenblum Cup

On Friday, October 15, 2010 Bridge professionals duked it out in the World Bridge Series Rosenblum Cup tournament. Check out how you would bid hands in comparison to Eric Rodwell – Jeff Meckstroth, Fred Gitelman – Mike Moss, Geoff Hampson – Eric Greco, Bob Hammon – Zia Mahmood. And to amuse yourself, compare variance how THEY bid and played some challenging hands – beginning at page 6:

http://www.worldbridge.org/bulletin/10_1%20Philadelphia/pdf/Bul_14.pdf

What’s up with BridgeHands blog changes?

 

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